Tag Archives: lunar rainbow

Going out with a bang (pt 2)- Livingstone and Zimbabwean Vic Falls

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Victoria Falls Lunar Rainbow- one of the most spectacular sights I’ve ever seen.

6th April: So our plan of having a lie in didn’t quite work out. Our body clocks still thought they were on safari and we both woke up at 5.30am! But ah well it was a beautiful day and we enjoyed the sunshine in the morning before catching a taxi to the Zambian ‘Frontier’ so we could walk over Victoria Falls Bridge into Zimbabwe- our 12th and final country of the trip. We got our exit stamp from Zambia and then made the rather soggy walk through no mans land, over Vic Falls bridge which spans the valley carved out by the Zambezi River, and onto the Zimbabwe immigration post. It’s a good 20 minutes walk from Zambian immigration to Zimbabwean immigration and you do get wet, but it’s definitely better to walk than to get a taxi as the view from the bridge of the Falls is fantastic. This waterfall truly is massive! 1700 metre wide and from the bridge you can see it all. Top tip though- don’t wear flip-flops. The ground is wet from the spray so I was flicking mud up the back of my legs the whole way- gross! At the Zim border we got our passports stamped and paid the $55 for our visas. A bit steep but I imagine GB makes it just as expensive for Zimbabweans to travel into the UK. It was then just a quick 2 minutes walk to the Vic Falls Park entry so we could check out all the viewpoints of the falls from the Zim side. We were worried we were going to lose money as we didn’t have the exact dollars for the entry ($30 each). But we needn’t have flustered, Zimbabwe has officially abandoned their own currency and now use US dollars, ever since Mugabe devalued the Zim dollar and ruined the economy….just another achievement to add to his list then! In the park and legs washed clean of mud, we browsed all the info boards and then set off on the 3km walk around the park to all its viewpoints. There have been 8 previous sites of the waterfall created as the Zambezi river has worked itself back upstream from fault line to fault line. The next line of the fault will originate from the area around the part of the falls called the Devils Cataract but will take another 10,000 years for the collapse. At 107 metres high, 1,737 metres wide, and pouring 1,100 m3/sec, Victoria Falls is the largest waterfall in the world. And yet again we were blown away by its magnitude and majesty as we wandered around the park, and of course getting absolutely drenched in the process! When we got to the viewpoint for Livingstone Island we were shocked at how close Zambia and Zimbabwe were at this point, plus we got a great view of the rock pool we swam in…it looked much scarier from this perspective face onto the falls; we swam so close to the edge! Absolutely saturated we came to the last viewpoint at Victoria Falls Bridge and saw many rainbows form and dissolve in the mist underneath it. Beautiful. We took the dry route back and the opportunity to dry off on our way to the park entrance. In the end I went to the bathroom and I took off my top and skirt to wring the water out before popping them back on and standing in the sun. Needed to at least look semi decent for where we were heading next, to visit the historically colonial Victoria Falls Hotel. We took a shortcut through the bush to the garden entrance of the hotel. The view from the hotel gardens is pretty impressive- the churning Zambezi cutting through the valley, the industrial elegance of the Vic Falls Bridge and the spray from the main falls continuously pushing up into the sky in the background. And then you turn around and see an equally impressive sight, which is the Vic Falls Hotel. A pillared sun terrace, white wash walls and terracotta tiles. We made our way, still slightly damp, to the Stanley Terrace and order a High Tea for Two (available each day from 3pm; $30). To share, we got a 3 tier display: 1 layer of sandwiches, 1 layer of plain and sultana scones with jam and cream, and 1 layer of dessert cakes; plus copious amounts of tea! It was delicious and we ate it all- we were stuffed! We enjoyed a delightful 2 hours eating, drinking and watching the rainbow in the mist travel from east to west under the bridge. It was a fabulous afternoon. After a mouche around the hotel we ventured into Victoria Falls Village. Not much was open on account of it being Good Friday, but we caught the end of the arts and craft market and Hedd bought the lowest and highest denomination of the obsolete Zimbabwe dollar- a $5 and a $100 trillion-dollar note! We walked back over the bridge and into Zambia again and thanked the lord for our good fortune. There was not a cloud in the sky and the Full Moon was really bright already; it was looking good for us seeing the lunar rainbow. We paid our entry into the Zambian side of Vic Falls Park and headed for the Eastern Cataract which is the best viewpoint to see the ‘Moonbow’- a rainbow produced from the light of the moon instead of the sun. We got there at 6.30pm and it wasn’t too busy but by 7pm the viewpoint was packed. We’d got a good spot and we waited for the sun to set and the light from the moon to do its magic. Suddenly we saw something try to form in the bottom left of the mist and soon a big arch of a rainbow formed. It was incredible. Sometimes the moonbow just appears grey, but the moon was drenching the mist in so much light we saw bands of red, blue and yellow. It was truly astonishing and I was so so pleased I’d been so anal about dates 1 year ago when we were planning the trip so we’d be in Livingstone for full moon. I was so so chuft to have seen it and it was a moment where I had a chance to reflect on just how lucky Hedd and I were to have been doing what we have been doing for the last 6 months. An amazing day.

Easter Saturday and another jammed packed day of activities. First up an Elephant backed safari! A rep from Zambezi Elephant Trails pick us up from the hotel at drove us 10 clicks out-of-town along the Botswana road to Thorntree Lodge within the Mosi-Oa-Tunya National Park. On arrival the Head guide explained the background to the Elephant trails. The 6 adult elephants were all rescue elephants from the 1960’s-80’s when there was a massive culling exercise in the Zambezi Valley and a drought in the Gonarezha National Park. There are 3 little ones too- One, the daughter of the matriarchal female who went ‘bush’ and came back pregnant 10 months later; one the daughter of Liwa who after seeing Mashumbi getting pregnant, wanted one for herself so went off with the older male called Bop! And then little Sekuti who got brought home by the herd after they went grazing on a nearby island; no wild herds had been in the area for months so it seemed the little 6 month old had been on her own for some time. So all in all this herd’s history sounded like something off EastEnders! The guide also explained how they trained the elephants using positive reinforcement (i.e. treats and rewards) as opposed to the controversial ‘discipline and submission’ technique commonly associated with Asian Elephants. After all that (oh and signing our life away on an indemnity form no. 250!) we got introduced to the elephants. They are MASSIVE! And we couldn’t quite believe we were about to ride one. We mounted the elephant using a raised platform and we were on Mashumbi, the Matriarch and leader of the pack so we were out in front. All the elephants had someone on them apart from Sekuti who just came along for the ride, frolicking around the herd. We looked like a proper cool elephant family! The 1 hour trail led us through riverine bush and along the banks of the Zambezi. It wasn’t so much of a safari but we did see Impala. It was such a great experience being so close to an elephant. They are a lot hairier than I thought and the very tips of their ears are truly paper-thin, soft and smooth with lots of veins running through; much like a back of a leaf looks. Back at base it was time to feed Mashumbi her treats. You had to drop them in her trunk or throw them in her mouth, but I was completely rubbish at it. The trunk just freaked me out! It is such a funny yet incredibly alien thing with 2 massive nostrils! Anyway the whole 2 hours was really fun and elephants are lovely creatures. Back at the hostel and a budget beans on toast lunch, before getting picked up at 4pm for our booze cruise. We got picked up in a massive open air safari jeep which got stuffed with backpackers as they crawled around every hostel in town picking people up. It was so noisy and perhaps a flavour of what was to come! We got on our boat called Mukumbi from the stage outside The Waterfront Hotel and positioned ourselves by the bar (obviously!). $55 dollars, all you can drink with snacks and a hot buffet thrown in. Can’t complain about that! We soon got in the swing of things, with the bar man refilling our drinks without us even noticing at times! We were so engrossed in our various conversations with people that we almost missed sunset! But we caught it just in time, plus saw some game (elephants and hippo’s) too. It was really good fun and we continued the drinking back at the hostel with a load of trainee medics from America we’d met. My goodness can they drink!

8th April: another classic morning after the night before! Unsurprisingly we had a lazy morning, but were up and about by lunchtime to get ready to visit Lubasi Home Trust, the local home for parent-less and homeless children. It was set up by a guy from Sri Lanka who owned a few businesses in Livingstone and was shocked at how many children there were living rough on the street, either escaping from violent homes (due to the challenge of living in extreme poverty) or being orphaned (due to parents dying from HIV/AIDS). The area didn’t have any facilities to help these children so he stumped up the cash, bought the land and buildings at Lubasi from the government and set up a charitable trust to care for them. That was in 2001 and they have been going ever since, heavily reliant on the volunteer ‘mums’ who work there. Hedd and I were there to donate some of our clothes and shoes and just hang out with the kids for the afternoon. Hedd played football and I read to the girls. Each of the children were so different. The home is only meant to have kids aged 5-10 but there were children up to 18 there. And some were so quiet and withdrawn with others outlandish. The chap opposite in the pic was one of the outlandish ones who wore my sunglasses the whole time and enjoyed playing (almost breaking!) my camera. But he was happy so that was the main thing. I also had a stash of hair bands which I gave out to the girls. Whether they used them for the right purpose or as catapults I do not know! We stayed there for a good 2-3 hours then walked the 30 minutes back to town, having a strange interaction with a local who laughed and said “Before looking up I knew you (hedd) were a man and you (helen) were a woman, because you (man points to hedd) have so much hair on your legs….so much hair!” Hehe, very true random local man, very true!

9th April, and our last full day in Livingstone. Up and out early doors to catch one of the first flights of the day up in a microlight for a aerial view of the falls. I was so excited about this, which only grew as we waited our turn watching others take off and land. We were flying with Batoka Sky from their base at Maramba Aerodome just outside Livingstone town. Our 15 minute flight would take us along the Zambezi, figure of eight over the top of the falls and then back over the Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park, and I couldn’t wait! Hedd was up first and I close behind in another microlight. My pilot was called Keith, he was from Scotland and had been here a month and it was great because it felt like he was as excited as I was to go up and have a glide around. I had a helmet on with ear phones so I could hear what Keith was saying. Although I struggled, goodness knows how non-english speaking people fare, he was Scottish after all! The falls from above are amazing, breathtaking and we got a great view of the Batoka gorge too. Keith pointed out various fancy hotels, and I could tell him “I’ve been there, I’ve done that”. Hedd’s pilot went low over the falls edge and he got wet from the mist. My guy went low over the national park and I got to see an elephant. It was a really great way to round the whole Victoria Falls/Livingstone experience off; I really recommend it! That evening to mark our last night in Livingstone we went for sundowner drinks at the Royal Livingstone Hotel. We got there about 6.30pm and it was pretty busy but we managed to get a table right by the water on the sundeck. The sun dips directly in front of you and to your left is the drop of the falls. Hedd went up to order our cocktails and was told to sit down (all waiter service here!), which was lovely but it did mean we waited super long for our drinks. We did manage to get them just in time for sunset though which is the main thing. Although I kind of wished the sun would move about 100 meters left so you would see it dip behind the falls, the African sunset was still tremendously beautiful and a great way to end our Victoria Falls adventure.

10th April and time to say goodbye to Livingstone which had been our home for 10 days and we had grown to love it. An hour flight to Lusaka in an even smaller plane (2 seats wide and an aisle) and a taxi ride to our hostel in Fairview, and we’d arrived at our last accommodation of the trip- Kalulu Backpackers. Not the nicest of hostels and the bathrooms were a 3 minute walk outside in the garden which was a bit odd, but the staff were friendly and they had 2 cute bunny rabbits and a crazy dog to keep us amused! Our last day of the trip we spent do a slight exploration of Lusaka. It’s not the nicest city in the world but we did make it to Kabwata Cultural Village in the South East of the city to do last-minute present buying for our families. Hedd has 3 sisters and 1 brother so plenty of people to souvenir shop for! Our last supper was at Mahak Indian Restaurant on Great East Road which was lovely. It wasn’t too far from the hostel so we walked to it. Although walking back in the dark I was convinced someone would jump out from the drainage ditches which run alongside most of the roads and made Hedd walk in the middle of the street with me just in case! Completely unfounded fear but we had been so lucky throughout the whole trip with regards to safety and crime, I just didn’t want anything to happen on our last night! Needless to say we arrived back to the hostel safe and sound! Just time for one last African cider (Hunters Gold) at the hostel bar, before packing and hitting the hay.

12th April 2012 and time to fly back to Britain. To London Heathrow to be precise, and terminal 5 from where we had left 23 weeks before. I was ready to come home I think, and in reality we had to- funds had dried up! There will be time to reflect on best bits, low points and greatest moments in another post perhaps. But for now I thank you for reading this travelogue. The last 6 months have been incredible, and it has been a great pleasure to share the experience with you through this series of chronological posts which I suspect I will treasure forever.

Livingstone and Zimbabwean Vic Falls in a snapshot:

    • Weather= Hot, but a little chilly in the Vic Falls spray!
    • Food= Baked beans on toast, cereal and UHT milk (budget running very low!)
    • Drink= Just too much box wine!
    • A must see in your lifetime= A lunar rainbow, a ‘moonbow’ (you can catch one at Full Moon at Vic Falls or at Waimea in Hawaii)
    • One of the funnest thing to watch= the trunk of an elephant- literally has a mind of its own!
    • A kindred spirit= “I never knew of a morning in Africa when I woke up that I was not happy”- Ernest Hemingway
Hedd’s words of wisdom:

What a place to end our trip. Victoria Falls is amazing, it is massive. The biggest waterfall in the world and we are seeing it in high water. Well of course you can’t see all of it in high water because of the spray, but what you can do is feel the full force of it. We saw the falls from the Zambia side and the Zimbabwe side and we got absolutely drenched. It was like walking through a monsoon in parts, so much water, so much mist, it was exhilarating. We couldn’t see the full falls, at each viewpoint we could only see a small section, but each section was so impressive and there were so many sections. We saw rainbows everywhere in the day and of course we had the privilege of seeing a lunar rainbow at night, quite a sight!! The falls is also where we did the craziest thing we’ve ever done, which says a lot given Helen did the highest bungy in NZ and I jumped out of a plane at 15,000ft. We swam at the top of Victoria Falls. Insane – Yes. Amazing – Yes! There were no safety harnesses here, just our local guide who would act as some sort of goalkeeper should you go too close to the edge! If you ever get the chance to do this, do it! You won’t regret it – unless you’re the unlucky one that goes over the edge!!

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